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Social Media Use and Perceived Social Isolation Among Young Adults in the U.S.

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Preventive Medicine, July 2017
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2714

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 4,441)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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176 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
661 Mendeley
Title
Social Media Use and Perceived Social Isolation Among Young Adults in the U.S.
Published in
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, July 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian A. Primack, Ariel Shensa, Jaime E. Sidani, Erin O. Whaite, Liu yi Lin, Daniel Rosen, Jason B. Colditz, Ana Radovic, Elizabeth Miller

Abstract

Perceived social isolation (PSI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Social media platforms, commonly used by young adults, may offer an opportunity to ameliorate social isolation. This study assessed associations between social media use (SMU) and PSI among U.S. young adults. Participants were a nationally representative sample of 1,787 U.S. adults aged 19-32 years. They were recruited in October-November 2014 for a cross-sectional survey using a sampling frame that represented 97% of the U.S. SMU was assessed using both time and frequency associated with use of 11 social media platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Vine, Snapchat, and Reddit. PSI was measured using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System scale. In 2015, ordered logistic regression was used to assess associations between SMU and SI while controlling for eight covariates. In fully adjusted multivariable models that included survey weights, compared with those in the lowest quartile for SMU time, participants in the highest quartile had twice the odds of having greater PSI (AOR=2.0, 95% CI=1.4, 2.8). Similarly, compared with those in the lowest quartile, those in the highest quartile of SMU frequency had more than three times the odds of having greater PSI (AOR=3.4, 95% CI=2.3, 5.1). Associations were linear (p<0.001 for all), and results were robust to all sensitivity analyses. Young adults with high SMU seem to feel more socially isolated than their counterparts with lower SMU. Future research should focus on determining directionality and elucidating reasons for these associations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 132 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 661 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 660 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 165 25%
Student > Master 95 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 92 14%
Researcher 40 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 29 4%
Other 104 16%
Unknown 136 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 149 23%
Social Sciences 91 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 49 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 33 5%
Computer Science 33 5%
Other 132 20%
Unknown 174 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2714. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2021.
All research outputs
#1,665
of 19,555,311 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Preventive Medicine
#2
of 4,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22
of 272,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Preventive Medicine
#1
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,555,311 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,441 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,997 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.