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Endocannabinoid Modulation of Orbitostriatal Circuits Gates Habit Formation

Overview of attention for article published in Neuron, May 2016
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291

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#24 of 4,759)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
30 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
57 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
179 Mendeley
Title
Endocannabinoid Modulation of Orbitostriatal Circuits Gates Habit Formation
Published in
Neuron, May 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.neuron.2016.04.043
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina M. Gremel, Jessica H. Chancey, Brady K. Atwood, Guoxiang Luo, Rachael Neve, Charu Ramakrishnan, Karl Deisseroth, David M. Lovinger, Rui M. Costa, Gremel, Christina M, Chancey, Jessica H, Atwood, Brady K, Luo, Guoxiang, Neve, Rachael, Ramakrishnan, Charu, Deisseroth, Karl, Lovinger, David M, Costa, Rui M

Abstract

Everyday function demands efficient and flexible decision-making that allows for habitual and goal-directed action control. An inability to shift has been implicated in disorders with impaired decision-making, including obsessive-compulsive disorder and addiction. Despite this, our understanding of the specific molecular mechanisms and circuitry involved in shifting action control remains limited. Here we identify an endogenous molecular mechanism in a specific cortical-striatal pathway that mediates the transition between goal-directed and habitual action strategies. Deletion of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors from cortical projections originating in the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) prevents mice from shifting from goal-directed to habitual instrumental lever pressing. Activity of OFC neurons projecting to dorsal striatum (OFC-DS) and, specifically, activity of OFC-DS terminals is necessary for goal-directed action control. Lastly, CB1 deletion from OFC-DS neurons prevents the shift from goal-directed to habitual action control. These data suggest that the emergence of habits depends on endocannabinoid-mediated attenuation of a competing circuit controlling goal-directed behaviors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 179 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 6%
France 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Chile 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 4 2%
Unknown 152 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 56 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 30%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Student > Master 16 9%
Student > Postgraduate 12 7%
Other 26 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 83 46%
Neuroscience 48 27%
Psychology 20 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 7%
Computer Science 3 2%
Other 13 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 291. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2017.
All research outputs
#17,807
of 7,684,314 outputs
Outputs from Neuron
#24
of 4,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,673
of 268,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuron
#3
of 162 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,684,314 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,759 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,277 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 162 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.